About your Search

20130101
20130131
STATION
KRCB (PBS) 11
LANGUAGE
English 11
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
of it. >> reporter: san francisco boasts that it recycles 80% of all garbage, and is aiming for zero waste. but some skeptics don' believe it. >> brown: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnee.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> sreenivasan: a federal appeals court rejected several recess appointments made by president oba last year, saying the moves were unconstitutional. the president appointed three people to the national labor relations board last january. the president argued he was justified in doing so because the senate was a
is the technology expert at barrango corporation of south san francisco, california, a preeminent player in the $2 billion-a-year visual merchandising business. >> we create props, decorations, displays for stores, shopping malls, amusement parks, any commercial properties. >> reporter: this all started right after the san francisco earthquake. a newly-arrived italian immigrant named barrango, a sculptor by trade, started making mannequins, the most lifelike anyone had ever seen. but it turns out the real gold was in holiday displays, and, for over 100 years, barrango has been manufacturing them and classic carosels for retailers around the country and the world, from boston to burbank, from berlin to beijing. yes, they ship to china, but they don't make it there. >> we've had the opportunity to go to china and have things manufactured, but we're a quality, hands-on family, company, and we need it to be in america in order to produce what we've got. we can't just turn it over to production in another country. >> reporter: it is that quality- first mantra, along with its global reachthat squired ba
growth. it has been going on at paul's hat works in san francisco's richmond district since 1918, the making of hats. lineage that runs from its peruvian founder over 94 years to four young women from the neighborhood. >> we were kind of an odd bunch before, didn't plan to be hatters, as most people probably don't, and stumbled on it, really did. stumbled on it. and the story and the ambience and that's what took us. >> mike: the story is a familiar one: in 2009, battered by the down economy, the owner needed to sell, no one would buy. so the option was to shut it down, walk away, hat in hand. except in walked a preschool preschool teacher, two costumers and a bookkeeper, saviors in bright colors, with passion. >> we did it because, a, this place was going to evaporate if we didn't. nobody else was going to do it. the four of us are makers of things. we love the craft and we love old crafts and this was something that you can only learn how to be a hatter by apprenticing. so this is a skill that they're not teaching in school. see, thiss kind of a taller crown. >> mike: what the
are skeptical. newshour correspondent spencer michels sat down with brown in san francisco. his report is a co-production with our colleagues at kqed-san francisco, and begins with some background on the fiscal troubles and the budget fix. >> reporter: california's sorry financial state and cuts made to health and welfare programs have prompted nearly nonstop demonstrations at the state capital in recent times. those protests got going four years ago when california and its then governor republican arnold schwarzenegger faced a staggering budget deficit of $42 billion. the recession, built-in spending, a large population in need of state services like health and welfare, a limit on property taxes, plus republican legislators' refusal to raise taxes created a dilemma in the world's ninth largest economy. with budget cuts coming like ock work, the state's college and university systems declined in offerings and in reputation. schools suffered cutbacks in personnel and programs. services for the poor were trimmed by $15 billion since 2008. state workers were furloughed. then in 2010, promising to
dr. sharon levine. >>> new study i referred doctor sharon levine, from san francisco, associated executive director of kaiser permanenty. that new study refers to schizophrenia and the new drug it was found is better than the existing drug, right? >> yes, that's right this. is a very important studdy and it demonstrated in a large population that the older antipsychotic drug, heldol, was more affective than the newer category called a typical antipsychotics. and it really speaks to the fact that we have a buys, all of us, consumers, physicians, we assume that new means improved. and in fact, what is really true is that needs to be established by solid evidence and not just assumption. this is a very important study for the federal government. very important study for state government. because this category of drugs is a substantial expense for the medicaid program. >> what's the cost between haldol and the new drug that came out? >> it's a difference between haldol and a entire category, the a typical antisigh cotics. it's a many expense. that doesn't mean haldol is the right dru
in a san francisco bar, is taking a college course in her apartment, online, on how to reason and argue. the teacher is walter sinnott- armstrong, professor of ethics at duke university in north carolina, and the class is free. >> so how do you learn the technique? the answer is very simple. you practice, and then you practice again, and then you practice and practice and practice and practice. this class has these really short little lectures, which is great because you can kind of watch one, and then think about it and react, and then you don't have to watch another whole hour like you would in class. >> reporter: "think again" is a class presented by a one-year- old for-profit startup called coursera, currently the nation's largest provider of free online courses. 170,000 students from around the world have signed up for it. the classes are called moocs, or massive open online courses, and they may be revolutionizing higher education. online learning is nothing new. colleges have been offering classes, usually for a fee-- and for credit-- for years. more than six million americans ar
.f.c. champion baltimore ravens will meet the n.f.c. champion san francisco 49ers in a game filled with intrigue. it's what's being called the har-bowl. it's the first time brothers will face each other from a opposing sidelines. the game also marks the end of one of the n.f.l.'s great careers with the retirement of ravens' linebacker ray lewis. joining me, peter king of "sports illustrated," widely regarded as america's premier n.f.l. writer. his column "monday morning quarterback" has become a must read for n.f.l. fans since it began 15 years ago. i'm pleased to have him back at this table. welcome back. >> thank you, charlie. appreciate it. >> rose: set up this game for me. you have said that the ravens should have the upper hand because they're on a roll an you beat peyto manning and tom brady, you deserve a certain amount of respect. >> well, if you go through your playoff run, after having a mediocre end to the year losing four of your last five and you come into the playoffs and you beat the young wonder kind, andrew luck, then you beat peyton manning and tom brady on the road and your de
lots of money. they had a fund-raiser last week with dianne feinstein in san francisco. they have already a million dollar contribution to what they're hoping to be a $20 million pac, that's a pac that would match the money the n.r.a. spent in 2012 to do very similar things tomorrow provide backup for people who take test votes on guns and to go after people who aren't willing to take the tough votes so it does rescramble this long range fight going forward. it doesn't change the immediate calculus because, like joe said, the real issue here from the white house's perspective is that they have a republican party that's not willing to do anything they really want and so they have to keep putting pressure on republicans in the house from the outside to force change at some point. >> rose: michael sherrer are, thank you very much, joe scarborough, thank you. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: we'll be right back. stay with us. >> >> rose: roger mcnamee is here, he is one of silicon valley's respected investors and co-founder of elevation partners. among his partners, u2's bono, the priv
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)